Postdoctoral Research Fellowship awarded to Dr Low26 September 2013

Dr Rand Low

Dr Rand Low, a Finance Tutor at UQ Business School, has received a highly-competitive Postdoctoral Research Fellowship from The University of Queensland for 2014.

The limited number of fellowships are awarded to early career researchers of exceptional calibre wishing to conduct full-time research at the University in any of its disciplines. Additionally, they recognise those with an outstanding research track record, and who demonstrate capacity for undertaking original work.

Dr Low was granted a fellowship for his research which aims to develop portfolio optimisation and risk management techniques, which stand strong in the face of financial crises. His project will create and test financial models that are able to capture excessive downside correlations and volatility to improve investment strategies.

Dr Low said: “The best thing about the UQ Fellowship is the fact that as a recipient, I am given the freedom to pursue my own independent research agenda. For me, this is a great opportunity to further investigate ideas that I have brainstormed with other academics at UQ Business School, as well as academics I’ve met during international visits.

“What attracts me to continue my research at the Business School is the excellent IT infrastructure, large number of databases, and the research profiles of the Professors who continue to act as my mentors. It is through their guidance and support that I successfully published a chapter from my thesis in the Journal of Banking & Finance earlier this year.”

Professor Andrew Griffiths, Dean of UQ Business School, added: “Competition for these awards has been extremely strong and this success recognises the very high quality of Rand’s research as an early career researcher. I congratulate Rand on this great achievement.”

To read more about Dr Low’s research, download the Discovery at UQ 2012 report.

Abstract from Rand Low’s research

This project aims to develop portfolio optimization and risk management techniques robust towards financial crises. During the period 2007-2009, governments and financial institutions were brought to the brink of systemic failure. Our project will create and test financial models that are able to capture excessive downside correlations and volatility to improve investment strategies. Tools will be created that monitor financial institutions that are taking excessive risks and identify those that are crucial to the financial system such that prudent measures and regulatory policies can be recommended. The expected outcome of this project will lead to research partnerships with industry. This project will impact the general community by creating methodologies that will (1) Reduce the likelihood of superannuation portfolios experiencing large losses during bear market regimes (2) Highlight financial institutions that are taking excessive risks such that regulators can intervene in a timely manner and reduce the likelihood of expensive bailouts by the government with public funds.

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