2019 Management Conference and Workshop

18 February, 2019 - 08:30 to 17:00
Sir Llew Edwards Building (14), room 217

Speaker One: Professor Jeffrey Loewenstein

Title:
Multiple perspectives: Implications for Negotiation and Conflict Resolution in Global Contexts

Abstract:
To communicate and form agreements, parties to a negotiation or dispute need to achieve some degree of mutual understanding. In global contexts, this can involve mutual understanding about proposals, the situation, the process, one another, and each other’s vocabularies. Consequently, in these contexts being able to consider multiple perspectives is an important skill. This talk will examine examples of cultural differences in perspectives, some of the components of the skill of considering multiple perspectives, and implications for research and teaching negotiation and conflict resolution in global contexts.

Bio:
Jeffrey Loewenstein is Associate Dean of Graduate Education and a Professor of Organizational Behavior at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign's Gies College of Business. His research and teaching are centered on creativity, negotiation, and leadership. He received his B.S. from the University of Michigan, his Ph.D. from Northwestern University, and taught previously at the Kellogg School of Management, Columbia Business School and The University of Texas at Austin.

 

Speaker Two: Dr Larry Crump

Title:
Negotiation Strategy and Power Workshop

Abstract:
Power and strategy are fundamental forces that operate within negotiation process although too often these concepts are studied and taught in a bilateral context when professional life is not purely bilateral. We often find linked bilateral negotiating, such as when we negotiate with our client and with our organization (supervisor) to achieve an acceptable outcome. We also negotiate in groups (committees, alliances, etc) that sometimes break into bilateral negotiations before reverting back into a group or multilateral negotiation. The Second South American Conference on the Environment supports experiential learning aimed at introducing participants to group negotiations that may also be linked to bilateral negotiations. Such dynamics add a level of complexity to the management of power and strategy within a negotiation. This 40-minute, 3-party experiential exercise will result in no agreement, a 3-way agreement or a 2-way agreement (thus excluding one party from the benefits of cooperation). The debriefing that follows this negotiation supports learning by examining participant strategies in securing power to control negotiation outcome.

Bio:
Larry Crump has spent over 20 years studying and teaching about negotiation complexity. He is Deputy Director of the APEC Study Centre at Griffith University and enjoys a tenured position in the Griffith Business School where he teaches in the Master of Business Administration and the Bachelor of International Business. Larry serves on the editorial board of the International Negotiation journal (affiliated with Johns Hopkins University), the Negotiation Journal (edited by Harvard Law School), and the journal of Negotiation and Conflict Management Research (edited by the International Association for Conflict Management). Most recently, Larry analysed President Trump’s strategy to re-negotiating the North American Free Trade Agreement to illustrate the utility of negotiation linkage theory (Negotiation Journal, 2019), studied Australia’s experience as G20 Chair to develop a pre-negotiation framework (Global Society, 2018) and examined the outcome of five Free Trade Agreements (within the APEC region) in conducting a theoretical analysis of the negotiation end-game (How Negotiations End, Cambridge University Press, forthcoming).

Prior to immigrating to Australia in 1994, Larry operated an international negotiation consulting business in Japan for seven years where he gained substantial experience studying and training in a specific area of complexity known as cross-cultural negotiation. Larry continues to provide training and consultation in Australia in manufacturing and commercial sectors and at federal, state and local levels. Overseas, Larry has taught for the European Commission, the Colombia Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores and at many universities. Larry can be contacted at: L.Crump@griffith.edu.au 

 

Speaker Three: Professor Matthew Honsey

Title:
Criticism, organizational culture and positive social change

Abstract:
Criticism of an organizational culture can be a catalyst for reform and positive change. Despite this, group-directed criticisms and recommendations for change can sometimes face high levels of defensiveness, and can do so even if the comments have objective merit. Furthermore, many intuitive strategies for overcoming defensiveness appear to be ineffective. In this talk I review my program of research on threatening group messages, and describe a model designed to predict when and why people will express resistance in the face of constructive group criticism. Practical implications of the model for promoting harmony and positive social change within and between groups are discussed.

Bio:
Prof. Matthew Hornsey graduated from a PhD in social psychology in 1999. Since then he has published over 130 papers, mostly on themes of intergroup communication; trust and trust repair; conflict management; and sustainability. These publications have been supported by a dozen ARC grants and three grants from the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research. He has received multiple research and teaching awards, and has served as an associate editor of three journals including Australian Journal of Psychology and Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin. He has co-edited two books: Feedback: The communication of praise, criticism, and advice (2012) and Rebels in groups: Dissent, deviance, difference, and defiance (2011). In 2018 he was elected as a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia.

 

Register now

Registration closes on Monday 11 February 2019