2018 Winter research projects

2018 Winter Research Projects

Country level Institutions as a moderator factor on Open innovation: A systematic literature review and identify research gaps

Supervisor

Rui Torres de Oliveira

Project Duration

6 weeks

Descr​iption

Background
Past literature suggested that formal and informal country level institutions influence innovation in general and open innovation in particular. An influential book sets a future agenda for open innovation and asks the following questions: “to what extent do we see open innovation practices in different institutional context? Is the distribution of knowledge altered by the institutional characteristics of different countries? Do we find commonalities in these different institutional settings that spur open innovation practices?”  (Chesbrough et al., 2006, pp. 14-25). We do believe, as the previous authors, that country institutions matter to open innovation and that this topic is core to advancing the innovation research and policy agendas. This theme is also core to our ARC Discovery grant and will be critical to the analysis of a survey that will be conducted in China during the second half of 2017.
Based on the above, we are calling for expressions from research students who want to join our project team over winter to:

Aim
Conduct a systematic literature review (SLR) on the role of country level institutions in open innovation and identify research gaps.

Approach
The summer project will follow a SLR methodology with the final objective of identifying research gaps. The winter scholar will follow Fink’s (2005) approach on how to assess and systematise academic literature to produce an explicit and reproducible SLR. This will guide her/him to develop an initial critical analysis on a specific body of literature and to understand the importance of divergent thinking to identify the literature gaps.

The researcher will learn how to use computer-assisted qualitative data analysis software, such as NVivo, and learn about template analysis (King, 2012) as an instrument to organise and codify qualitative data. In general, this work will be useful for the purpose of our broader ARC project, but it will be particularly important for the survey-based project that we are conducting in China.

Expected outcomes and deliverables

The successful applicant will join a team of highly productive scholars, consisting of three Chief Investigators and a Post-Doctoral fellow, who will provide a collegial working environment. The team has well developed skills in conducting SLRs and is well-known in the research field.

The applicant can expect to develop:

  • Skills in conducting SLRs – a method that has wide application in research and practice;
  • Skills in using qualitative data analysis software, such as NVivo;
  • Learn a qualitative analysis technique, template analysis, and understand that is possible to structure qualitative research.

The deliverables will be:

  • A review paper that identifies the connections between country institutions and open innovation;
  • The identification of research gaps in the literature;
  • A research article that, should it be of suitable quality, will be submitted to a conference or journal.

Suitable for

The successful applicant will be a post-graduate (honours or masters) student who:

  • Has knowledge of the field of innovation, or related fields of entrepreneurship or strategy.
  • Aims to complete further studies in business.
  • Has well developed writing skills.
  • Has a good work ethic with good time management and organisation skills.
  • Ideally, has some experience or qualifications in qualitative research methods.

Further information

Interested applicants should email their CV and a statement of their motivation to participate in this project (one page) to Rui Torres de Oliveira (r.oliveira@business.uq.edu.au).

References

Chesbrough, Henry, Vanhaverbeke, Wim, & West, Joel. (2006). Open innovation: Researching a new paradigm: Oxford University Press on Demand.

Fink, Arlene. (2005). Conducting research literature reviews: from the Internet to paper: Sage.

King, Nigel. (2012). Doing Template Analysis. In G. Symon & C. Cassell (Eds.), Qualitative Organizational Research (pp. 426-450): Sage.s

Advancing tailored travel vaccine communication: A persuasion and message effects perspective

Supervisor

Dr Jie Wang

Project Duration

04 Jun – 14 Jul 2018 , 6 weeks [The commencement date is negotiable with project supervisor. Students should ensure that an earlier start date does not interfere with exams or assessment.]

Description

In 2016, Australians have made 8.3 million short-term international departures with over 3 million of these movements to Asia where the rabies disease is endemic. Because Australia is free of rabies (except Australian bat lyssavirus causes a rabies-like illness) many travellers are not well aware of this deadly disease and not cautious about coming into contacts with animals that can be the source of rabies.

This study aims to identify the effective messages to communicate with Australian travellers visiting South East Asia regarding preventive measures against rabies. Previous studies have identified the main segment of rabies exposure in Australian travellers is the age group between 20 and 29 (Mills et al., 2011), who therefore will become the target of this study.

Effective risk communication can lead to the reduction in morbidity and mortality caused by communicable diseases while minimising the damage that communicable diseases can cause to national economies and public health infrastructure. It is therefore essential to examine and develop effective communication materials. In the case of rabies, immunization is of particular importance and thus requires effective message strategies to raise travellers’ awareness and encourage them to be vaccinated before departure. Although pre-exposure rabies vaccination does not eliminate the need for additional treatment after the exposure, it simplifies management by eliminating the need for rabies immune globulin and decreasing the number of doses of vaccine needed.

Message source could be varied to determine whether more credible or more trusted sources exert more impact. It may be productive to tailor the source of health information to individual characteristics, including not only demographics but also culturally relevant values and beliefs. Message effectiveness may be enhanced if tailored to a person’s health locus of control (Holt, Clark, Kreuter, & Scharff, 2000). Tailored messages may be especially useful when emotional arousal facilitates behavior change

This study has several research objectives:
1. Examine the relative cognitive processing of gain framed versus loss framed rabies vaccine messages.
2. Examine  the effects of information source medium and pre-existent characteristics of targeted audiences on their behavioural intention regarding pre exposure rabies vaccine

This study will employ both qualitative and quantitative methods and use the eye-tracking method (lab experiments) to refine message elements.

Expected outcomes and deliverables

The student may gain skills in literature review, experiment design, health communication campaign design, data collection and analysis. The student is asked to produce a written report at the end of the project.

Suitable for

This project is open to applications from students with a background in communication (especially health communication, risk communication) or marketing, 3-4 year undergraduate, honours, or masters by coursework students, UQ enrolled students only.

Further information

Students can contact the supervisor prior to submitting an application.
Dr. Jie Wang, UQ Business School, j.wang16@uq.edu.au

Tracking Entrepreneurs’ Experiences. Exploring interview data and writing case summaries

Supervisor

Associate Professor Paul Spee

Project Duration

6 weeks

Description

This project involves coding interviews with entrepreneurs about their startup experiences. The projects builds on an existing research project in the Brisbane startup ecosystem.

The entrepreneurs are all early stages of launching their ventures and the interviews track their progress over a two year period.

Coding the interviews involves identifying themes within the interviews, assigning per-defined codes to different sections of the interview transcripts.

Expected outcomes and deliverables

Candidates can expect to gain skills in qualitative methods as part of the project including how to code and summarize interview data. Training in Nvivo is also provided.

On conclusion of the project case summaries of the entrepreneurs’ experiences are expected.

Suitable for

This project is suitable for students who are interested in developing skills in qualitative methods. It is particularly suitable for students who are interested in pursuing an honours degree or a research component in a Master Degree as the project provides training in research methods.

Further information

p.spee@business.uq.edu.au

Applicants are welcome to contact the supervisor prior to submitting an application

The Effectiveness of Virtual Leisure Experiences in reducing Burnout

Supervisors

Dr Gabby Walters

Project Duration

4 weeks

Description

Studies in the tourism field argue that holidays reduce stress and provide a break from work, yet the current working environment is increasingly limiting workers’ ability to take leave (Beeton, 2010). This is not only reducing productivity in the workplace, but also creating health issues associated with employee burnout.
This study is interested in the ability of Virtual Reality leisure experiences in reducing the level and occurrence of burnout among those who identify as struggling to maintain a healthy work life balance.

A lab-based pre-post experimental design will be implemented to test the effectiveness of Virtual Leisure Experiences in reducing Burnout associated symptoms such as exhaustion, cynicism and a lack of self-efficacy.

Expected outcomes and deliverables

The scholar will gain extensive training in Laboratory based research methods, in particular the use of virtual reality software and how to conduct experimental studies in a lab based setting. It is expected that this research will lead to a conference presentation as well as a full journal article both of which will list the student as a co-author.
Virtual reality is featuring significantly in the tourism and leisure literature as an innovative approach to leisure substitution for those who are unable to partake in tourism / leisure experiences.

Suitable for

This program is suitable for an Honours or Masters Course work student. Basic research skills are essential. Priority given to students who have completed or are in the process of completing a thesis.

Further information

For further information about this project or you are interested in applying please contact Gabby via email – g.walters@uq.edu.au prior to submitting your application.

Creating a “Pitching Research” Academy

Supervisors

Professor Robert Faff

Project Duration

4 weeks commencing 25 June 2018

Description

This project seeks to build on the success of the “pitching research” concept developed by Faff (2015), who provides a simple 2-page template tool, SO THAT a novice researcher can confidently and succinctly convey all the essential elements of a new research proposal to an academic expert. The tool is both methodical and succinct in its design.

Notable landmarks to date, in developing this tool:

  • In 2015, a small grant ($2000) was received from Accounting Association of Australia and New Zealand (AFAANZ) to build a web portal for creating pitches. See: PitchMyResearch.com
  • The pitching template is being used as the basis for AFAANZ Research Grants (2015 & 2016: > $1.5million dispersed since 2003) and the “PMR” web portal is currently being modified to accept 2016 applications
  • “Pitching Research” has engaged with novice researchers across many disciplines including: accounting, finance, management, marketing, strategy, international business, tourism, medicine, public health, food science, engineering, pharmacy, philosophy, ethics, education, business information systems and psychology
  • Substantial investment in supplementary resources: online library with worked pitch examples across > 70 different areas; various YouTube videos, etc
  • Substantial investment in pitching workshops/talks: presented at 29 Australian universities, and 16 different countries.

As a consequence of the above, in 2016 “pitching research” recently received an accolade from the accreditation body AACSB.

Aim/Objective

Primarily using the newly created web portal, PitchMyResearch.com, this project seeks to:

  1. Give a meaningful “taste test” of research to undergraduates – especially those on a 4th year Honours track, through a blend of individual and group work activities.
  2. Explore “digital scholarship” applications of the “PR” framework.
  3. Further expand the worked examples available to help guide novice researchers how to use the template tool.
  4. Provide pilot examples of pitches that leverage off the “Research Skill Development” framework [see Faff (2016)]5
  5. Collect student based feedback on how best to develop the web portal resource into a more useful T&L tool right across UQ.

Project significance

By enhancing an already established tool for starting research, this project will continue developing a larger technology-driven initiative for use across all faculties at UQ.

References

  • Faff, R., (2015), “A Simple Template for Pitching Research”, Accounting and Finance 55, 311-336.
  • Working papers (highlighting prior Winter/Summer scholars work):
  1. Faff, R.., (2017a), “Pitching Research”, Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2462059 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2462059
  2. Faff, Robert W., (2017b), Pitching Research®: A Comprehensive Resource Center Supplement (August 14, 2017). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3018939
  3. Faff, R., (2016b), “Mapping “Pitching Research” Tasks into the RSD7 Framework: A Pedagogic Perspective”. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2724451
  4. Faff, Robert W. and Li, Ya and Nguyen, Bao Hoang and Ye, Qiaozhi, (2016), “Pitching Research: A Pilot Experiment with UQ Winter Scholars” (July 30, 2016). Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract= 2816233
  5. Faff, Robert W. and Carrick, Robin and Chen, Angel and Dallest, Kathy and Escobar, Marisol and Foley, Gabe and Gill, Chelsea and Khong, Bo Xuan Matthew and Liu, Maggie and McCullough, Jon and Ndugwa, Zina and Nguyen, Bao Hoang and O'Brien, Shari and Orole, Felix and Qureshi, Asma and Rad, Hossein and Rekker, Saphira and Shahzad, Syed Khuram and Smith, Marita and Tunny, William and Wallin, Ann, (2017), “Motivating Postgrad Research Students to Pitch Their Ideas: What Have We Learned from “Pitching Research” Competitions at UQ?” (January 15, 2017). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract= 2899942
  6. Faff, Robert W. and Carrick, Robin and Chen, Angel and Escobar, Marisol and Khong, Bo Xuan Matthew and Nguyen, Bao Hoang and Tunny, William, (2017) “Pitching Research: A Reverse-Engineer “Sparring” Experiment with UQ Summer Research Scholars” (January 23, 2017). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2903811
  7. Faff, Robert W., Carrick, Robin, Chen, Angel, Escobar, Marisol, Khong, Bo Xuan Matthew, Nguyen, Bao Hoang and Tunny, William, (2017b), “Fantasy Pitching III: UQ Summer Research Scholars – the Role of “Money” in the 21st Century” (January 26, 2017). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2906617
  8. Faff, Robert W., Carrick, Robin, Chen, Angel, Escobar, Marisol, Khong, Bo Xuan Matthew, Nguyen, Bao Hoang and Tunny, William, (2017c) “UQ Summer Research Scholar Program: Insights and Reflections from the Pitching Research “I-Templates” Team” (February 16, 2017). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2919027

Expected outcomes and deliverables

The successful scholar will, with close guidance from the supervisor:

  1. Be exposed to a simple tool designed to kick start research, with a role of helping to gather feedback on its enhanced web development.
  2. Get first-hand experience of the challenges in starting research on topics relevant to their academic interests, either as a prospective Honours student or a current research student.
  3. Create several reverse-engineered examples of completed research pitches relevant to their research interests, showcasing recent research completed within UQ Business School.
  4. Assist developing other “pitching” related resources and initiatives – especially from a digital scholarship perspective.
  5. Co-author several working papers on SSRN.

Suitable for

This project is suitable for very high achieving students who are enrolled in their final year of undergraduate study (and seriously thinking of Honours enrolment) or Coursework Masters students.

Further information

Robert Faff, r.faff@business.uq.edu.au

 

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